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FAA will not authorize higher production of 737 Max in the near future

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The head of the Federal Aviation Administration, Mike Whitaker, recently stated that Boeing has not been given approval to increase production of its 737 MAX 9 jets, and this is not expected to happen in the next few months. The decision comes after a meeting with Boeing following safety concerns raised in the wake of an incident involving an Alaska Airlines flight in early January. Boeing was directed to develop a comprehensive action plan to address safety concerns in their manufacturing processes, which the FAA has reviewed. The agency will continue its enhanced oversight of Boeing and its suppliers in the coming months to ensure that safety standards are met.

Whitaker emphasized the need for Boeing to follow through on corrective actions and transform their safety culture to meet the new standard set by the FAA. One of the changes being implemented is the requirement for Boeing to have a mandatory safety management system to identify hazards and manage risks in a structured and systematic manner. The FAA will continue to monitor Boeing closely by conducting weekly meetings with senior leaders to review performance metrics, progress, and challenges faced by the company. Monthly reviews will also be conducted to assess Boeing’s progress in addressing safety issues.

The decision to not increase production of the 737 MAX 9 jets comes as Boeing works to address safety concerns and improve its manufacturing processes. The production cap was implemented following an incident in early January, and Whitaker indicated that there is no set timeframe for when production may be increased. The FAA’s continued oversight of Boeing and its suppliers is aimed at ensuring that safety standards are met and maintained, and the agency will closely monitor Boeing’s progress in implementing corrective actions and transforming its safety culture.

Boeing has been directed to develop a comprehensive action plan to address safety concerns in its manufacturing processes, and the FAA has reviewed the plan to ensure that it meets the agency’s standards. The mandatory safety management system required by the FAA will help Boeing identify hazards and manage risks in a structured and systematic way. The agency will continue to monitor Boeing closely by conducting weekly and monthly reviews to assess the company’s progress in addressing safety issues and improving its safety culture.

The decision to not increase production of the 737 MAX 9 jets is part of the FAA’s efforts to ensure that Boeing has adequately addressed safety concerns and improved its safety culture. Whitaker emphasized the need for Boeing to follow through on corrective actions and effectively transform its safety culture to meet the new standard set by the FAA. The agency will continue to provide enhanced oversight of Boeing and its suppliers in the coming months to ensure that safety standards are met and maintained. Boeing will be required to have a mandatory safety management system to identify hazards and manage risks in a structured and systematic way, and the FAA will closely monitor Boeing’s progress in implementing these changes.

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