Connect with us

News

Yonkers’ long-standing Memorial Day tradition returns after 2-year pause

Published

on

YONKERS, N.Y. — Yonkers veterans marched up McLean Avenue on Memorial Day for the first time after a two-year pandemic pause Monday.

They continued a long-standing tradition of honoring our fallen heroes at a remembrance ceremony and parade, CBS2’s Jenna DeAngelis reported. 

“That goes back to 1868 when General Logan, from the Union obviously, designated May 30th as Decoration Day,” said Marine Corps veteran Bill Regan.

“As long as there’s one person here, then we’re continuing the tradition of making sure that we don’t forget those who made the ultimate sacrifice,” Mayor Mike Spano said. 

“This is a day for reflection and honoring the fallen heroes of this country and not to focus on barbeques and going to the beach and stuff like that,” U.S. Army veteran Bob Palladino said. 

It was one of many events across the Tri-State Area.

Advertisement

From Farmingdale to Freeport on Long Island, parades honored those who earned our freedoms. 

“Freedom of speech, freedom of protest, freedom of religion, freedom that this country has today,” U.S. Navy veteran Robert T. Kennedy said. 

A new tradition was started in Massapequa Park. At noon, sirens blared to signal a county-wide moment of silence.

Nassau County Executive Bruce Blakeman launched the effort after seeing how Israel observed Holocaust Remembrance Day.

“For 50 seconds, we’re asking everybody, stop what you’re doing,” Blakeman said. “It’s a solemn day. It’s a day to remember that there are a lot of young people who never came back from war.” 

The solemn sound of taps filled the air around the Intrepid and the hearts of hundreds of veterans who gathered in New York City. 

“Foundation of our country will always be that worthy fight,” Gov. Kathy Hochul said. 

Advertisement

From the unfurling of an American flag, to laying down wreaths in the Hudson River, to an aerial salute, each offered a moment of reflection on what Memorial Day is about. 

“Freedom is not free,” said Richard Adams, a veteran.

Source: CBS

Follow us on Google News to get the latest Updates

Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending